coffee :: whereist istanbul

 |  CATEGORIES: Whereist Eyup and Fatih

 

Molla Aşkı Cafe has a nice view of the Golden Horn along with fresh hookah and their selection of herbal tea’s.

Tags: , , , ,

 |  CATEGORIES: Shopping, Tours, Whereist Eminonu

Tahtakale is like the Ebay of istanbul. Whether it be Chinese made electronics, LED lamps, batteries, curtains, bed sheets, plastic beads and jewellery,  local made knives, woven baskets, wooden chairs, clocks, all kinds of vitamins or even viagra this is the place to go shopping for.  Even if you don’t want to buy anything, you must experience this authentic shopping disctrict.

IF you’re planning to stroll through the Grand Bazaar while in town, take an hour or two to walk down the serpentine streets that lead to the Egyptian Bazaar (Misir Çarsisi) along the banks of the Golden Horn by the Galata Bridge. Tahtakale extends northwest from here to Rustem Pasha Mosque.

The sector raises with customers particularly at the weekends when people come everywhere from the city, seeking the discount vetant, or the plastic accessories, the staionery and cheap toys in the streets behind the spice bazaar. You will not find the shops chew great shopping centres, the customers in Eminönü are a working class much more traditional .

Eminönü

The narrow street rising called Mahmutpaşa for example is the place where those in preserving matter come to buy a coat or a headscarf, or to the kit their boys outside in the costume they carry the day of circumcision. Eminönü crawls with thousands of goods hawking people on charettes with arm, dispatch hold or a cover presented in the street, like the workshop and store million small in the streets, of the bazaars and the large stone fortresses of the era of stool called Han in Turk. Each inch is space with the detail, even the underpasses taking of the people of the vats are furnished with the stores, the grills of kebab and the boys selling of the cigarettes. Foreseeable there is a considerable quantity purse-to seize and of pickpocketing in crowd. And it is difficult to maintain the streets narrow clean. There are thus many companies packed in a so small sector that a simple street or even a simple building can be the epicentre of a particular trade, and the rotation of a corner will take to you in a completely different atmosphere. Here that you are surrounded by the stall after stall of the jeams of denim, and through a block you are submerged in the perfume of the coffee and spices. The variety is the amazing catches and Eminönü to explore. Some well-known secondary_zones (semt) include: Sirkeci – edge of sea by the station where all vats are coupled. The streets behind the docks are the places to buy the electronic goods, the photographic equipment, the bicycles, and all kinds of paper mill. All the things in their true or distort versions. Kapalı Çarşı

Sultanhamam behind the spice bazaar, the sector of the toys, the pearls and the plastic jewels which take to you until Mahmutpaşa previously mentioned. Tahtakale along the gold horn of the spice bazaar, come here for all kinds of equipment of kitchen, tools of garden, and electricals such as telephones. If your radio of car is stolen come in Tahtakale and to still buy it behind. Cağaloğlu – street of fleet of Istanbul – a labyrinth of the printers, booksellers and traditionally of the newspapers:

http://www.whereist.com/wp-content/uploads/HLIC/2befe96107e8bb9392847fa6ff5b786b.jpg

Yolu couch, relatively calms it, delimited by trees, avenue of tram of Sultanahmet at the university, including the called Roman column Çemberlitaş. Beyazıt – the house of the university of Istanbul and the remote end of the large bazaar: The large bazaar – in the bazaar itself you will find gold, of the jewels, the carpets, antiquities, and the memories. In the streets around you more same thing more all the kind of clothing, leather goods. Mercan – below the bazaar, the place to buy any kind of bag or towel, Lâleli – bourdonnant with hotels, bars and people of old Soviet Republics buying the clothing of discount; Kumkapı – the market in fish, and restaurants approximately as many as fish themselves.

What you’ll find

This is artisan central. You’ll stroll through cobble stone alleys filled with wood crafters, metal workers, the toy quarter, etc….

Historically speaking, Tahtakale housed Istanbul’s first cafés sometime in the mid-1600s

STRICTLY SPEAKING

15=on bes; 20=Yirmi (pron. yeermee); 30=otuz (pron. otouz); 40=kirk (pron. like Kirk Douglas); 50=elli; (pron. ellie); 60=altmis (pron. altmush); 70=yetmis (pron. yetmeesh); 80=seksan (pron. sexan); 90=doksan (pron. doxan); &, 100=yüz (pron. yeuz)

tahtakaleticaret.net/eminonu_shopping.html

www.planeteye.com/LocalGuide/-1-0/Istanbul+Turkey+2396.aspx?page=4

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

 |  CATEGORIES: Bars & Drinks, Food, Tours, Whereist Beyoglu

http://www.whereist.com/wp-content/uploads/HLIC/4465a3c463fbc4e0c790ff46a166ef8f.jpg

Coffee break!: Another place that offers fantastic Turkish coffee is a shop called Gezi located right beside the Atatürk Cultural Center in Taksim. It is possible to see famous people there almost all the time. Attracting people with its handmade chocolates and desserts, the bakery offers dishes from both the Turkish and Ottoman kitchen. Gezi actually has four sections: a bakery, a cafe, a restaurant and a chocolaterie. One can find all kinds of desserts, meals, coffee, jams and organic goods at Gezi.

www.geziistanbul.com/

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

 |  CATEGORIES: Bars & Drinks, Food, Tours

There is an amazing venue located at Rumelihisarı, offering a wonderful view of the Bosporus. Turkish coffee is heated over the stove. Known for its traditional Turkish coffee, Sade Kahve offers breakfast early in the morning and continues to serve customers until sunset. The shop is located in the Oduncubaşı seaside home of Ayla and Recep Aral.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

 |  CATEGORIES: Bars & Drinks, Food, Tours, Whereist Beyazit

In recent years, many restaurants, cafes and hotels have replaced Turkish coffee with coffee made by automatic machines. International coffee shop chains appeal to young people, making espressos more popular than Turkish coffee.

A group of people who love to drink coffee and are disturbed by the diminishing popularity of Turkish coffee set up the Turkish Coffee Culture and Research Foundation last year. The chairman of the foundation is Atom Damalı, its members include people who contribute a great deal to the sector such as Ahmet Örs, Mehmet Aksel, Merve Gürsel, Osman Serim, Semir Orcan and Ali Sözmen. The mission of the foundation is to set up a standard of how to make Turkish coffee and give it the global attention it deserves. The foundation is also planning to write a book and film a comprehensive documentary on Turkish coffee.

Where did Turkish coffee come from?

Coffee, which is a crop native to Ethiopia, spread to the Arabian Peninsula, especially Yemen, after the 11th century. In 1517, Yemen Governor Özdemir Pasha fell in love with the drink when he was introduced to it and brought it to İstanbul. But the Turks changed the method of preparing coffee by using copper vessels called güğüms and coffee pots called cezves. Coffee made through this method eventually became known as Turkish coffee. Coffeehouses, the first of which opened in Tahtakale and quickly spread across the city, introduced locals to Turkish coffee. Sipping coffee and listening to poetry, literature and recitations from books at coffeehouses became a popular social activity during that time. News of the delicious coffee spread to Europe — and from there, to the rest of the world — with Ottoman messengers and merchants and travelers passing through İstanbul. Initially, Turkish coffee was made without sugar. Instead, it was customary to eat or drink something sweet before or after drinking coffee. But today, Turkish coffee is made either plain or with different amounts of sugar depending on taste.

Where to drink Turkish coffee

Coffee pleasure by the poolside:

Çorlulu Ali Paşa Medresesi is a historic location. Located on the tramway road in Beyazıt, the medrese is a popular venue for coffee and nargile addicts. It is a gathering place for college students and a frequent stop for retired people, local merchants and tourists. The medrese, which offers guests the opportunity to drink coffee under sycamore trees by a poolside, is open until 2:00 a.m. Guests can also visit the rug repair shop in the medrese.

Tags: , , , , ,

 |  CATEGORIES: Bars & Drinks, Food, Tours, Whereist Eyup and Fatih

Taste Turkish coffee heated on coals:

Nevi Cafe is located in Ayakapı. It was used as a police station during the Ottoman Empire and was later restored to its authentic character. Attracting customers with its view of the Golden Horn and fascinating decor, the cafe is especially popular for its Turkish coffee, which is heated on coals. A visit to the past and an amazing cup of coffee await guests at the cafe.

Tags: , , , , , ,

 |  CATEGORIES: Bars & Drinks, Bosphorus, Food, Tours

A beautiful coffee shop in Çengelköy:

Çınaraltı Kahvesi is a special place where one can enjoy either tea or coffee while enjoying a breathtaking view of the Bosporus. Located in Üsküdar’s Çengelköy neighborhood, the coffee shop gets it name from the historical sycamore tree (Çınar in Turkish) it was built under. It opens at 7:00 a.m. and continues to serve customers until midnight. Çınaraltı Kahvesi was used as a setting for Turkish television shows “Süper Babe” and “Çınaraltı.”

www.cengelkoycinaralti.com/

Tags: , , , , , ,

 |  CATEGORIES: Bars & Drinks, Food, Tours, Whereist Driving Scenic Tour

In recent years, many restaurants, cafes and hotels have replaced Turkish coffee with coffee made by automatic machines. International coffee shop chains appeal to young people, making espressos more popular than Turkish coffee.

A group of people who love to drink coffee and are disturbed by the diminishing popularity of Turkish coffee set up the Turkish Coffee Culture and Research Foundation last year. The chairman of the foundation is Atom Damalı, its members include people who contribute a great deal to the sector such as Ahmet Örs, Mehmet Aksel, Merve Gürsel, Osman Serim, Semir Orcan and Ali Sözmen. The mission of the foundation is to set up a standard of how to make Turkish coffee and give it the global attention it deserves. The foundation is also planning to write a book and film a comprehensive documentary on Turkish coffee.

Where did Turkish coffee come from?

Coffee, which is a crop native to Ethiopia, spread to the Arabian Peninsula, especially Yemen, after the 11th century. In 1517, Yemen Governor Özdemir Pasha fell in love with the drink when he was introduced to it and brought it to İstanbul. But the Turks changed the method of preparing coffee by using copper vessels called güğüms and coffee pots called cezves. Coffee made through this method eventually became known as Turkish coffee. Coffeehouses, the first of which opened in Tahtakale and quickly spread across the city, introduced locals to Turkish coffee. Sipping coffee and listening to poetry, literature and recitations from books at coffeehouses became a popular social activity during that time. News of the delicious coffee spread to Europe — and from there, to the rest of the world — with Ottoman messengers and merchants and travelers passing through İstanbul. Initially, Turkish coffee was made without sugar. Instead, it was customary to eat or drink something sweet before or after drinking coffee. But today, Turkish coffee is made either plain or with different amounts of sugar depending on taste.

Where to drink Turkish coffee

Coffee shop famous for its celebrities:

One of the most popular places to drink coffee in İstanbul is a coffee shop right by the waterside next to the Bebek Mosque. It is frequented by figures from the media, art and cinema world. It is especially crowded during the summer. It is also a great venue for a weekend breakfast. Coffee addicts love the foamy coffee offered there. It is open every day between 7:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m.

Tags: , , , , ,

 |  CATEGORIES: Bars & Drinks, Food, Tours, Whereist Beyazit

Where to drink Turkish coffee

Coffee brewed in sand:

A coffee shop Şark Kahvesi operated by Oğuz Atalay located in the Grand Bazaar is the ideal place to sit down and relax after touring the bazaar. The coffee shop has been serving in the Grand Bazaar for almost 60 years and attracts people from all walks of life, especially tourists. Calligraphy and faded photographs attract people’s attention. The famous coffee is heated in hot sand.

In recent years, many restaurants, cafes and hotels have replaced Turkish coffee with coffee made by automatic machines. International coffee shop chains appeal to young people, making espressos more popular than Turkish coffee.

A group of people who love to drink coffee and are disturbed by the diminishing popularity of Turkish coffee set up the Turkish Coffee Culture and Research Foundation last year. The chairman of the foundation is Atom Damalı, its members include people who contribute a great deal to the sector such as Ahmet Örs, Mehmet Aksel, Merve Gürsel, Osman Serim, Semir Orcan and Ali Sözmen. The mission of the foundation is to set up a standard of how to make Turkish coffee and give it the global attention it deserves. The foundation is also planning to write a book and film a comprehensive documentary on Turkish coffee.

http://www.whereist.com/wp-content/uploads/HLIC/9a00d2750f32dcdbda14a9aed267411c.jpg

Where did Turkish coffee come from?

Coffee, which is a crop native to Ethiopia, spread to the Arabian Peninsula, especially Yemen, after the 11th century. In 1517, Yemen Governor Özdemir Pasha fell in love with the drink when he was introduced to it and brought it to İstanbul. But the Turks changed the method of preparing coffee by using copper vessels called güğüms and coffee pots called cezves. Coffee made through this method eventually became known as Turkish coffee. Coffeehouses, the first of which opened in Tahtakale and quickly spread across the city, introduced locals to Turkish coffee. Sipping coffee and listening to poetry, literature and recitations from books at coffeehouses became a popular social activity during that time. News of the delicious coffee spread to Europe — and from there, to the rest of the world — with Ottoman messengers and merchants and travelers passing through İstanbul. Initially, Turkish coffee was made without sugar. Instead, it was customary to eat or drink something sweet before or after drinking coffee. But today, Turkish coffee is made either plain or with different amounts of sugar depending on taste.

http://www.whereist.com/wp-content/uploads/HLIC/3528abfaf0920ef8a6697129ab4ccb32.jpg

Tags: , , , , ,

 |  CATEGORIES: Bars & Drinks, Food, Tours, Whereist Eyup and Fatih



In recent years, many restaurants, cafes and hotels have replaced Turkish coffee with coffee made by automatic machines. International coffee shop chains appeal to young people, making espressos more popular than Turkish coffee.

A group of people who love to drink coffee and are disturbed by the diminishing popularity of Turkish coffee set up the Turkish Coffee Culture and Research Foundation last year. The chairman of the foundation is Atom Damalı, its members include people who contribute a great deal to the sector such as Ahmet Örs, Mehmet Aksel, Merve Gürsel, Osman Serim, Semir Orcan and Ali Sözmen. The mission of the foundation is to set up a standard of how to make Turkish coffee and give it the global attention it deserves. The foundation is also planning to write a book and film a comprehensive documentary on Turkish coffee.

Where did Turkish coffee come from?

Coffee, which is a crop native to Ethiopia, spread to the Arabian Peninsula, especially Yemen, after the 11th century. In 1517, Yemen Governor Özdemir Pasha fell in love with the drink when he was introduced to it and brought it to İstanbul. But the Turks changed the method of preparing coffee by using copper vessels called güğüms and coffee pots called cezves. Coffee made through this method eventually became known as Turkish coffee. Coffeehouses, the first of which opened in Tahtakale and quickly spread across the city, introduced locals to Turkish coffee. Sipping coffee and listening to poetry, literature and recitations from books at coffeehouses became a popular social activity during that time. News of the delicious coffee spread to Europe — and from there, to the rest of the world — with Ottoman messengers and merchants and travelers passing through İstanbul. Initially, Turkish coffee was made without sugar. Instead, it was customary to eat or drink something sweet before or after drinking coffee. But today, Turkish coffee is made either plain or with different amounts of sugar depending on taste.

Where to drink Turkish coffee

Coffee with an amazing view:

Located on the hills of Eyüp, with an amazing view of the Golden Horn, the Pierre Loti Cafe is a popular venue for those who want to escape the city. The cafe can be reached by walking up stairs passing through the cemetery located next to the Eyüp Sultan mosque. If you sit near the very front, you can see an amazing view of the Golden Horn before you and sip a delicious cup of coffee. The cafe gets its name from famous French author Pierre Loti, who lived between 1850 and 1923. As a naval officer, Loti came to Turkey in 1876 and stayed for a year. It was during that same year that he discovered the historical coffee on the hills of Eyüp. Ever since then, the cafe on that hill has been called Pierre Loti.

Tags: , , , , ,