grand bazaar | whereist istanbul

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The column that gives Çemberlitaş (column with rings) its name was in times a plaited Column where the statue of Constantinus stood at the top. It was renovated from the early days because of the continuous disasters. After the fires at Ottoman times the column has been supported by iron rings in order to stand safely, and what is left is this 35 meter tall column.

The column was dedicated on May 11, 330 AD, with a mix of Christian and pagan ceremonies. In 's day the column was at the of the Forum of Constantine (today known as Çemberlitaş Square), an oval forum situated outside the city walls in the vicinity of what may have been the west gate of Antoninia. On its erection, the column was 50 meters tall, constructed of nine cylindrical porphyry blocks surmounted by a statue of Constantine in the figure of Apollo. The orb he carried was said to contain a fragment of the True Cross. At the foot of the column was a sanctuary which contained relics claimed to be from the crosses of the two thieves who were crucified with Jesus Christ at Calvary, the baskets from the loaves and fishes miracle, an alabaster ointment jar belonging to Mary Magdalene and presumably used by her for the washing of the feet of Jesus,[1] the palladium of ancient Rome and a wooden statue of Athena from Troy.

From where you are standing, you should be able to see the famous Turkish Bath Çemberlitaş , once called Valide Hamam. It was built in 1584 by great Ottoman architect Mimar Sinan for Nûrbânû Sultan  Nurbanu Sultan, the wife of Selim II and mother of Murat III as a way to provide subsidies for a charity complex located on the Asian side in Üsküdar.  However if you want to have a cheaper and calmer experience I advise Gedik Ahmet Paşa, a few streets down and right on the other side of the tram tracks.

The you see above is Atik Ali Paşa mosque. One of the oldest in , build in 1496 by Hadım Atik Ali Paşa.

Atik Ali Paşa was a eunuch who was the head of The Gate of Felicity (Bâbüssaâde Gate) the entrance into the Inner Court in the palace. He rose to the rank of Grand Vizier and general under . Eunuchs were common in the Ottoman's as they were in Roman and Byzantine (Saint  Ignatius of Constantinople, General Narses of Rica Riots fame) civilizations. Their close position to the Sultan in the palace enabled them to have high opportunities.  Chief White Eunuch (Kapı Ağasi), was in charge of 300 to 900 white eunuchs as head of the 'Inner Service' (the palace bureaucracy, controlling all messages, petitions, and State documents addressed to the Sultan), head of the Palace School (school for pages training as white eunuchs), gatekeeper-in-chief, head of the infirmary, and master of ceremonies of the Seraglio, and was originally the only one allowed to speak to the Sultan in private. In 1591, Murad III transferred the powers of the white to the black eunuchs as there was too much embezzlement and various other nefarious crimes attributed to the white eunuchs, but later they regained some favour. Hadım Sinan Pasha (1516–1517) and Gürcü Mehmed Pasha  (Hadım Mehmed Pasha) 1622-1623  are other eunuchs that were important Grand Viziers in Ottomans.

Other famous Ottoman eunuch's are Hadim Ali Pasha, governor of Rumeli (entire Balkan Region) in 1491, who also funded the school adjacent to the Atik Ali Paşa Mosque.    Start walking down the column, you'll notice an open air parking lot to your left. We'll make a left and follow through this parking lot, however before that, you can view some restaurants on Vazirhane street or Molla Fenari street as well. Molla Fenari Street to the side of the column goes inward, turns into Vezirhane street a little later.

Molla Fenari (named after Fatih Sultan Mehmet's teacher,poet and the kadı of Bursa (k. 1393, 1415), and the first Ottoman Şeyhülislam). He explained the world as a book made out of divine letters.Divine letters carry the essential truth and knowledge of God. These letters combine to make words, sentences, phrases, and texts, all of which are divine. The human being called insan-ı kamil is the most perfect creation of this book. Fenari explained being as composed of a physical visible body, and metaphysical invisible essence. He described body as a form (wujûd), and essence (zât) as the fundamental nature, the hidden truth within this body. All essence was one and unified, and referred to the oneness of unity (el-Ehadiyye). However bodies manifested were illusions and they referred to the multiplicity of unity (el-Vâhidiyye). Fenari declared that God was the only thing whose essence and body were equal to one another. There was no representational space between God’s essence and his body that would allow for any illusion, or interpretation. Fenari acknowledged that the essence of God was different than the essence of all other things. However his body participated in the manifestation of other bodies, the body of things. According to Fenari, body was not a real quality attributed to the essence. It was a metaphorical quality attributed to the essence. Thus if body was considered as a quality of the essence, it would mean that essence would always require the presence of a body.

The essence of God was described according to its qualities (sıfat). These qualities were listed as Life, Science, Will, Power, Audition, Sight, Speech and Creation (Hayat, İlim, İrâde, Kudret, Semi’, Basar, Kelâm, Tekvin). They were neither static descriptions of the essence of God, nor images reflecting it. Fenari explained these qualities as relative natures with respect to the essence of God. These qualities were then manifested in names of God. Finally, the names of God were manifested in things. This representation taking place in three stages, evolving from the True Being and finally completing in things, in the sequence of essence-quality-namething, could not be traced back to the essence of God. Thus the thing would never be considered as equal to the name, the quality, or to the essence of God itself.

According to Fenari, qualities were not directly illustrated in names, or they were not equal to them. As well, the names once manifested in the presence of things, became hidden, and invisible to the eyes of the human being. Though those people who trained themselves, who were illuminated were able to see the presence of the name of God, and his qualities in things created.

In Vezirhane street you'll see Aslan Restaurant to your right. It is one of the best tradesman restaurants, makes fine traditional Turkish food. Before you reach the restaurant if you followed left, through the open air parking lot you'll be in Tavukçu Pazarı (Chicken Bazaar) sokak. There is also an interesting fish restaurant here, in Tavukçu Pazarı street, passed the corner of Nuruosmaniye street, find number 58 on Tavukcu Pazarı on your right and enter through a door with no name and climb a few stairs and you will surely see an interesting small spot. Before our trip if you want to eat something you can choose either one of the restaurants. If not let's get back to the corner of  Tavukcu and Nuruosmaniye cd. Before we make it to The let's make a few stops, for example Nur-u Osmaniye MosqueAt the begining of the Nuruosmaniye street, to your right you will see Sofcu Han, it would be nice to enter it's courtyard and take a look. It is an old building but not really worn down. Yağcı Han (Oil mall) across the Nuruosmaniye street is another mall. Further ahead to the right you'll see an store, where once stood a fountain. The famous Nur-u Osmaniye will stand to your right a little further ahead, enter and take a look around courtyard and inside. This entrance ramp to the royal gallery where Sultan passed on his horse on his way to the mosque is interesting.

This mosque's construction was started in 1748 by Mahmud 1st. For unknown reasons his life was not enough to complete it so Osman 3rd finished it on 1755. And so the name is attributed to Osman. A Greek architect named Simeon is believed to have constructed it. The mosque is a really different representative of the Baroque style which was dominating those days. The four dome's of the mosque, non-rectangular inner courtyard, nice gardens and other buildings of the complex are particularly well designed. 

It was built by architects Mustafa Ağa and Simon Kalfa from the order of Sultan Mahmut I and completed by his brother and successor Sultan Osman III. The architects adopted Baroque , the mosque is also distinctive with the absence of an ablution fountain (Turkish: şadırvan).In style, the complex is distinguished from its precedents with its adoption of elements and embodies the westernizing vision of Mahmud I. While there is little known about its architect, Simeon Kalfa, its construction is documented in detail by construction manager Ahmed Efendi in a booklet entitled "Tarih-i -i Serif-i Nur-i Osmani". The name Nuruosmaniye, or the Light of Osman, is thought to refer to Osman III and to a verse from the Sura of Al-Nur, — " of the heavens and the earth", which is inscribed inside the dome. The prayer hall is square with a semi-circular mihrab apse and is crowned with a large dome 25 meters in diameter and raised to a height of 43.50 meters on four monumental arches. The interior space is activated by wide galleries that surround it on three sides. There are no aisles; the space below the galleries is an exterior arcade and is accessed through two side doors with cascading steps. At three different places — the entrance and the two corners flanking the qibla wall — the galleries are widened to form balconies that project into the prayer hall carried on columns. The corner balconies are deepened further with the inclusion of arcade space; the one to the east is the sultan's lodge and has gilted latticework between its columns. It is accessed primarily by a ramp outside the mosque that allowed the sultan to ascend to his quarters on his horse. The baroque influence is conveyed through the extensive use of sculptural elements such as pilasters and cornices, and baroque motifs, such as garlands (decorative cords), finials (apex of a gable, top of the triangle sections) and scallops (curved projections forming an ornamental border) . Going beyond mere imitation, the Nuruosmaniye mosque achieves one of the finest instances of Ottoman baroque, a unique synthesis between classical Ottoman and contemporary western styles that is epitomized in the scallop muqarnas domes crowning its portals. The library is a single-story building set on a high platform accessed by two sets of stairs located to the west that lead into separate entryways. An Arabic inscription above the entrance states: "Demand science, from the cradle to the grave." It has a cross-plan with widely rounded corners and consists of an elliptical reading room enveloped by an arcade made of fourteen columns. Opened in 1755 with eighteen employees, the Nuruosmaniye Library is a branch of the Süleymaniye Library today and today it contains personal collections of Mahmud I and Osman III with a total of 7600 volumes of which 5052 are manuscripts. From 1932 to 1950 the ezan, the call to prayer was voiced in Turkish in mosques instead of the Arabic which nobody understands. The imam who voiced this first Turkish call to prayer, Sadettin Kaynak, requested in his will for his funeral prayer to be performed here.

We'll leave the mosque on the side of Şerefefendi (Mr. Şeref street) sokağı. At the corner you'll see Şeref Han build in 18th century. Continue down the street, further ahead to the right is the Mahmut Paşa Mosque and tomb.

Mahmut Paşa was one of the first grand vizier's of Fatih. As a child, he was captured in Serbia by the horsemen of sultan, it was common for Ottoman's to enlist in the high level of their ranks, high level administrative posts, men who were born Christians, children of Aristocratic families in captured lands, and who had close relatives that remained in Christianity. He was of Greek and Serbian origins (his last name was Angelovich, Angeolos) yet as is many people who converted to Islam, he was rather fanatical in his views even though his mother and brother were remained Christians. Mahmut Paşa played an active role in the siege of Constantinople where he was given the task of besieging the walls extending from Myriandrion to the Golden Gate. He was actually assigned the most difficult mission in the final moments which would be to cross the moat and scale the walls while being protected by the archers and cannoneers. After the siege he was immedeately appointed as the Grand vizier, replacing Çandarlı Halil Paşa. His brother Michael Angelovich was an ambassador prince voyvoda / despot of serbs , as a matter of fact Mahmut Paşa was responsible for drafting one of the peace agreements with the serbs, where his brother was the contact on the other side. The courtyard of this mosque was where his body was prepared for its final journey. He was loved to much that he was declared a saint for a while after his death. The mosque was constructed with two dome's for the interrior to reach the desired size in space. There are no oher mosques with two domes. In 1473 there were also rumors that Fatih Sultan Mehmed's ( Mehmed II) son Price Mustafa was in an affair with one of the wives of Mahmut Paşa. She was cast away by Mahmut Paşa who divorced her upon learning this, but had to remarry her upon pressure from the sultan, yet they didn't live together and stayed away. Mahmut Paşa was dismissed from the post of Grand Vizier in 1743 and retired to Hasköy. Price Mustafa the beloved son of the Sultan died in 1474.  Upon his death Mahmut Paşa decided to visit the Sultan in Istanbul to give his condolences, however the Grand Vizier that replaced him was scared of his influence and spread rumors about his sincerity. Sultan imprisoned Mahmut Paşa until he was executed. He was strangled with a bowstring. The use of bowstring for the execution of Mahmud Paşa shows the great respect in which he was held in Ottoman courts since it was the most honorable from of capital punishment, with no blood shed and was reserved for the royal family or very high officials. He was burried in the türbe in this mosque. In the tiled tomb of Mahmut Paşa there is a sense of Selçuklu which is nice. A couple decades later, Ibn Kemal the famous Turkish historian ends the chapter on Mahmud Paşa with these lines from the famous Persian mathematician, philosopher, astronomer, physician, and poet Omer Khayyam:

Every brick that is on the battlement of a palace Is the finger of a Vezir, or a head of a Sultan.

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Choose Mahmut Paşa Mahkeme street, where you entered the mosque from, again after you exit the mosque. Before you enter Küçük Yıldız Hanı Street make a right towards Kılıççılar street (sword makers street) . This is a nice, narrow street with shops lines on both sides, which you'll find joyful to walk through. Further ahead to your right, you will see an arched door , this is the entrance of Çuhacı Han (broadcloth mall) , lets enter Çuhacı Han an exit through the other door. We are on Çuhacı Han street.

We are almost in Grand Bazaar. After many earthquakes, fires and repairs there are 2 restaurants, 4399 stores, 2195 rooms, 495 closets, 12 exchanges offices, 1 mosque, 10 mescids, 1 hammam Turkish bath, 19 fountains, 8 wells, 24 malls, 1 school and one tomb, in a 47000 m2 area. These days not all of these stand of course. Sandal Bedesten (Sandal Bazaar) and Cevahir Bedesten are the first buildings of the grand bazaar to be completed by Mehmet the conqueror. An eagle relief on one of the four gates of Cevahir Bedesten brings to minds that this might be made during Byzantine times, yet it makes more sense that it was constructed in Ottoman times and a stone from Byzantine era was used on the gate. As it is a closed building and it is locked at nights and on Sundays it was most preferred by valuable goods traders. However it was a place where everything was purchased and sold. It's streets were divided into sections and this can still be noticed today in the street names.

Now the important thing is to decide which way we will enter inside the bazaar. There are so many gates that it is highly probable that we will get lost. However let us take you in through a gate that not many people know despite so many entrances. Walk down the Çuhacı Han street and reach Mahmut Paşa gate. If don't want to walk around much you can just enter through Mahmut Paşa Gate. However if you want to see this little known gate mentioned, right before you reach Mahmut Paşa Gate, to your right there will be Kalcılar Han. It is right outside the Mahmutpaşa gate to your right. (Kal means -stay- in turkish and this used to be a place where people coming from all around Anatolia would tie their horses on the entrance and -stay- in the inns on the upper floor, roughly translates to "stayers"). Let's enter inside this mall, which has a nice courtyard, if you take a look you'd appreciate. Inside this Kalcılar Mall but right before it's courtyard to your left there is a tiny little narrow street named Sıra Odalar (Lined rooms) , enter and walk all the way until the end, when you make another left you will pass through a narrow corridor find yourself in Grand Bazaar on Kuyumcu Kamil Öztoprak (jeweler kamil öztoprak) street.

Grand bazaar is located at the northern edge of a larger market neighborhood that occupies the southern hillside of the Golden Horn where commercial ships arrived with their loads. From here, the merchandise was distributed to the hans and wholesale markets for distribution throughout the city. Some of these raw goods made their way up the hill to the artisan workshops of the covered bazaar whose streets are named after its artisans: slipper-makers (terlikçiler), shoe-makers (kavafçilar), mirror-makers (aynacilar), wash-cloth makers (keseciler), fez-makers (fesçiler), comforter-makers (yorgancilar), silk-thread makers (kazazcilar), polishers (perdahçilar), fur-makers (kürkçüler), just to name a few. At the heart of the Ottoman bazaar are two bedestens, or domed masonry structures designed for safe storage and sale of luxury goods, that were built by Mehmed II (1451-1481) following the conquest in order to revive trade and provide income for the newly converted Mosque. Byzantium also had a central market with streets allocated to trades and crafts; however, its exact location and its state at the time of the Ottoman conquest are not certain. It is equally difficult to identify what stood on the site prior to the Ottoman reconstruction. The two bedestens, built less than fifty meters apart facing two different directions, were quickly surrounded by shops and vaulted arcades; scholars estimate that the bazaar had reached a third of its current size by the end of Mehmed II's rule.

Sandal Bedesten (Sandal warehouse / bazaar) will be right in front of you but let's leave that for later. If you make a right on the gate you entered the bazaar and walk straight ahead you will see a little jewelry shop named Boybeyi. This is not like the other stores. It is like a small 2 story hut in the middle of the street, walk around it and you'll see. This used to be a Turkish custard shop, and, it beats me how they fit in but there would be people on the second floor sitting down eating custard. Imagine that while looking at this store, I cant say it has much attractiveness after it became a jewelry. Walk towards this jewelry hut Boybeyi but follow to the left of it. You would be on Halıcılar street (carpet street) where most cafe's are today. To the left of this street is the Cevahir bedesteni. Before we enter lets touch the locations on this street. Here is Fes Case, Cafe Moak, Ethem Tezçakar coffeeshop. All are places where we can sit and eat and drink things to our liking. If you are not tired yet, we will soon see once we pass the Bedesten, Şark Kahvesi or Havuzlu restaurant you can wait for these. You will also see a store named "Deli Kızın Yeri"("The Crazy Girls Place"). This belongs to an American couple who used to work at the American embassy and they loved Turkey so much that they stayed after their retirement and opened up a shop here. Enter Cevahir Bedesten to your left, the entrance is next to Fes Cafe. Once you enter Cehavir bedesten and see this oldest spot of Grand Bazaar . you will exit through the street on your right, Zenneciler street, (Zenneci means the seller of clothing and shoes for women)  İç Bedesten, Cevahir Bedesten, Old Bedesten  used to be a place where guns were sold. It preserved that state up until 34-40 years ago. Besides guns all kinds of jewelry and valuable materials were also here. Sculptures, arrows, bows, swords, daggers, this place was almost like a museum back then. And people who bought and sold these goods were very experienced people. By time, these goods lessened and left their place to ordinary goods. In addition to jewelry sales and auctions for the slave trade (outlawed in 1847), the Old Bedesten was also used by all merchants of the covered bazaar as a safe deposit for money and precious goods. Its floor space is occupied by a large number of small wooden stores today. Today, the bedesten does not have the look of the bedesten 35-40 years ago. Still compared to other parts of the grand bazaar it is a calmer and more serious section. There are no salesman here that screams and shouts and pulls the client inside the store from their arm. There are salesmen who take their jobs seriously, know the goods they sell and people who doesn't just want to sell the good but also inform the client about their purchase. In this aspect they claim tourists are even more attentive to their purchases, history of their items, how to care for them, more than the locals. Back in the days of the Ottoman era, there were no ornaments and no advertisements either. It was purely an eastern practice, it was the noble unambitious attitude of a Turkish-Islamic society that regarded any endeavor to attract customers or to praise one's own skill or one's own goods as shameful and degrading. Sales items were simply displayed on the shelves.

First, there were two Bedestens forming the nucleus of the Bazaar: İç (Inner) Bedesten and Sandal Bedesteni . The four adjacent sides and the immediate surrounding of the Bazaar were encircled by hans (the business buildings) each of which were a separate unit in themselves. The jewelers have been shown to be outside the Bedesten because jewelers meant two different professions. One was the gold and silversmith, working in gold and jewels, the other jewelers dealing with precious stones like diamonds, pearls etc. In the Ottoman Empire Period, gold and silver were not a means of accumulating wealth as they are today, but were merely treated as articles for daily use, there was no necessity for the artisans and their materials to be taken within the massive Bazaar walls . The jewelers were Inner Bedesten merchants . Another function of the Bedesten apart from being a market for precious stones was that, it was a safe keeping  institution for the valuables of the rich served parallel to the safe deposit boxes concept in modern banking. Hence, the security in the Bedesten was so firm and doubtless. In the Bazaar in its classical pattern each street and alley were reserved for certain professions. Foreign travelers who had an interest in Istanbul noted that they find this system of grouping the trades and crafts according to the products they produce, very rational for production and trade organization. This principle of settlement which was a requirement and consequence of the guild system was useful for price uniformity and control . In order for a guild to be formed, there had to be sufficient traders. When the necessary number was met, they were considered as a licensed trade monopoly and their numbers and working places are stabilized. The number of jewelers, who were the oldest and most crowded artisans of the Bazaar, increased from 279 in 1960 to, 364 in 1972. With this increase the jewelers reached an important share in the Bazaar. In 1965 jewelers took place in and around Sandal Bedesten in the east part of the Bazaar. Hence, the Bazaar shifted from its aim of being a Bazaar of needs, as it was ones it had been founded, and became a core of trade, tourism and production, reflecting their contemporary cultures.

 

Grand Bazaar (Covered Bazaar) by Orhan Veli (Varlık, 1.3.1947)

you know the scent of yet unworn laundry,
in the rooms of cedar chests;
thats the scent of your store.
you dont know my sister,
she was going to be a bride in Independence, had she lived;
these are her  threads,
this is her veil.
and how about these women on the windows?
these bright blue
these bright green dressed…
do they keep standing like this as well at nights?
and how about that one with the soft cotton shirt,
does she not have a story as well?
don't sell the covered bazaar short,
A covered bazaar, a covered box.

 

. you'll see Şark Kahvesi straight ahead. Şark Kahvesi as I mentioned before is a nice place to sit. The coffee shop has been serving in the Grand Bazaar for almost 60 years. The famous coffee is heated in hot sand, which I highly suggest you try.  When you are done, walk up to the left side of Fes Cafe and continue up from Fesçiler street (The fes hat makers street).When you see Kuyumcu street (jeweler street) make a right. Here, because of the -monumental- pool at the entrance, there is a restaurant named Havuzlu Restaurant. You can take a seat here as well.

If you are rested, lets continue our walk from Şark kahvesi. We follow Yağlıkçılar street, so Şark Kahvesi will be on your left this time. You'll see on your left the Çakır Ağa mosque. This mosque inside the bazaar even has a small minaret. At the time of the ezan, the imam climbs 3-4 stairs and from the top of the minaret with the help of a microphone calls the storeowners to namaz. Further ahead on your left you'll see Cebeci Han. If we continue straight ahead this road will take us to Örücüler Gate (the weavers gate)  as well as the Örücüler hamamı. This is a relatively small hamam, however insides is surprisingly "spacious enough" as with all hamams. This one shot to fame a couple years ago when Turkish superstar Tarkan closed it for a private party inside before he was off to Turkish army, a mandatory duty. This part of the bazaar is also a good place to buy kese, the traditional scrub of Turksh baths and houses. It works much better than you can imagine and at $1 a piece you should grab one from the store right at the gate.  We don't intend to leave the bazaar yet, so with Örücüler Gate being on our back, we will continue from the street right across Cebeci Han on our left Perdahçılar street (optic makers street) .

At the end of this road, where it meets Acıçeşme Street, across and a little bit to the right, is the entrance to one of the finest places in the bazaar: Zincirli Han. This place is preserved well on every aspect. The stones on the ground, the stores on the upper level and even the stairs in between are as they were in the past. Before you enter the courtyard if you climb upstairs from the stairs to your left you will see that the stores surrounding the courtyard did not see any need to advertise their business with large signs. All stores look alike and made their own doors inside yet as the green authentic doors are still standing in front of these, the look has not been damaged at all. When you peek inside the windows of these stores you will notice that inside are as the past as well. No one can guess that there are luxurious jewelry inside those green doors.

Significant Stores: Adıyaman Pazarı – Yağlıkçılar Cad., No: 74-76 Tel: (212) 526 97 59. Emin Çömez Yağlıkçılar Cad 101–103, covered bazaar Excellent hat stall, well-stocked in winter with Russian and Turkish wool, leather and fur. This street is also good for traditional Anatolian textiles. Iç Bedesten Covered bazaar The "Old Bazaar" is where the most precious objects have traditionally been kept. It's the place to go for antiques, reproductions and souvenirs of every kind, from Ottoman hamam slippers to pistols and silver jewellery. Kato Export Halıcılar Cad 55, covered bazaar Ottoman copper and Byzantine icons from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. May Kolancilar Kapısı Sok 7, covered bazaar bags, belts, purses and so forth, as well as ceramics. Sarnıçlı Han Çadırcılar Cad 5, covered bazaar A wholesale and handicraft bazaar: lots of copperware. Sivaslı İstanbul Yazmacısı Yağlıkçılar Cad 57, covered bazaar Hand-woven and hand-embroidered textiles, both old and new. Sofa Nuruosmaniye Cad 42, Cağaloğlu Old prints, maps, , contemporary art and quality ceramics. Yurt Antika Cebeci Han 51, covered bazaar Central Asian carpets, kilims and textiles, some antique. It supplies to many other shops, so prices tend to be lower, and smaller items, such as cushions, go from 3YTL.

Once we are back out of Zincirli han if we continue to left from this point, we will arrive at the spot we entered the bazaar. Lets not go back completely yet continue passed Kuyumcular street and enter Sandal Bedesten. This is again one of the oldest structures in the bazaar. Back in the days there used to be auctions here but not anymore. In the Ottoman times before the auction began traders flocked inside as guards opened the doors and once everyone was positioned in front of their own stores, the upper ranked prayer conductor would lead them all through a prayer for the Sultan. Followed by an oath that there wont be any "deception, trickery, monopoly on a good, and no purchases or sales without a guarantor" which only then would proceed to the auction. Once we exit the Bedesten we are on Kalpakçılarbaşı street, we make a right and walk the street from one end to the other. You will see the Kürkçüler Çarşısı (the fur makers bazaar) on your left. After the 1945 fire the fountain that was enliven is also on this path. This street is as a matter of fact one of the least pleasant, or rather uninteresting streets of the bazaar. It is almost like an avenue, even a car would fit in. The end of this street is the Beyazıt Gate. Perhaps you might want to visit the Sahaflar Bazaar (second-hand thrift book sellers) once you exit this gate. Eminönü Walk- Çemberlitaş-Kapalı Çarşı Parkuru

 

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Construction on the Nuruosmaniye Complex began in 1749 during the rule of Mahmud I (1730-1754) and was completed by his brother and successor Osman III (1754-1757) in 1755. It is located to the east of the covered bazaar and was built to replace the Mascid of Fatma Hatun, which burnt in a fire. In style, the complex is distinguished from its precedents with its adoption of design elements and embodies the westernizing vision of Mahmud I. While there is little known about its architect, Simeon Kalfa, its construction is documented in detail by construction manager Ahmed Efendi in a booklet entitled “Tarih-i -i Serif-i Nur-i Osmani”. The name Nuruosmaniye, or the Light of Osman, is thought to refer to Osman III and to a verse from the Sura of Al-Nur, “ of the heavens and the earth”, which is inscribed inside the dome.

Nuruosmaniye Mosque

The Nuruosmaniye (Turkish: Nuruosmaniye Camii) is an Ottoman mosque located in the Çemberlitaş of Fatih district in Istanbul, Turkey. It is considered one of the finest examples of in . It was built by architects Mustafa Ağa and Simon Kalfa from the order of Sultan Mahmut I and completed by his brother and successor Sultan Osman III. The architects adopted Baroque , the mosque is also distinctive with the absence of an ablution fountain (Turkish: şadırvan). Nuruosmaniye Mosque is located near the entrance to the Kapalıçarşı (), Column of Constantine and the historical Atik Ali Paşa Mosque.

The mosque was constructed in in Nuruosmaniye region, it was began in 1748 during reign of Mahmoud I, and, ended in the reign of Osman II in 1755, the architect of the mosque is Mustafa Aga.

The foundation of the structure was supported by belts because it was constructed on a spring. It has an inner courtyard and an outer courtyard. There are three doors in the inner courtyard, one in the middle, two on each sides. Inner courtyard is covered by nine domes, one in the middle and four on each side.

Beneath the gallery of minarets (Serefeler) there are horizontal tapes. Minaret spirals are made out of stone. It has five floors with 174 windows. The belts of these windows are arch shaped. On the dome, there are 32 windows. On each left and right sides of the altar there are a pulpit (mimber) made out of . Inner walls of landing (Sahan) is divided into three by two rowed thick and projecting cornices. All through the landing of the pulpit is “The Fatiha Sura” (a prayer of Koran) is carved in marbl.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuruosmaniye_Mosque

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Built from 1500 to 1505 under Sultan II, the Beyazit is one of the oldest in Istanbul. It is located next to University and the in the of a large 16th-century complex that includes schools and other buildings.

Interior
Interior. Photo © Dick Osseman.

History

Construction on the Beyazit Mosque began in 1501, overseen by architect Yakubsah Bin Sultan. The mosque was built over the ruins of the Forum of Tauri built by the . The pavement of the courtyard and the pillars of the ablutions fountain are reused materials from the Forum.

The Beyazit Mosque was completed in 1506. died in 1512 and was buried in the gardens with his family.

What to See

The mosque’s architecture is inspired by the Byzantine Ayasofya, with a central dome, semi-domes, and a central prayer area with galleries. The dome is 16.78 meters in diameter (the ’s is 31m). Other elements were inspired by the Fatih Mosque, such as the buttresses and columns alongside the dome.

The mosque was once at the center of a large complex, including a school (medrese), kitchen, caravanserai, , and soup kitchen for the poor. The soup kitchen and caravanserai, on the left of the mosque, now house the Beyazit State Library, while the former medrese houses a school of .

Quick Facts

Type of site: Mosque
Dates: 1501-06
Architecture:
Status: Active
Architect: Yakubsah Bin Sultan
Location: Yeniçeriler Cad., across from Beyazit tramway stop
Coordinates: 41.011° N, 28.965° E
Phone: No phone
Hours: Dawn-dusk
Cost: Free

www.sacred-destinations.com/turkey/istanbul-beyazit-mosque.htm

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The Turkish Ministry of Culture’s Revolving Capital Administration (DOSIM) Stores

www.gelenekselelsanatlari.gov.tr/index.php?language=eng

issuu.com/turgan/docs/dosim

works created in different periods as well as new works by new masters are for on Dosim stores in connection with Ministry of Tourism Culture.

Traditional Turkish Handicrafts, replicated soil products, stone products, mineral products, glass products, animal products, vegetable products, textiles and jewelry are sold in these stores. The Ministry of Culture and Tourism publications are also sold through these DÖSİM stores.

is one of the great pleasures of a trip to Turkey and the rich variety of Turkish crafts makes it impossible to resist buying something. Fine apparel of silk, cotton, leather and wool; artful jewelry; leather accessories; brilliant faience (colored tiles); vessels of copper, brass, , meerschaum and alabaster worked by master artisans; and of course heirloom-quality Turkish and kilims, are among the most popular purchases. Great value and an enjoyable shopping experience can be found everywhere, from small towns to big cities. Visit the “What to buy” section at www.turizm.gov.tr/ to discover shopping opportunities in each province…

Unique regional handicrafts make shopping that much more enjoyable. Traditional Turkish handicrafts crafts including carpets, ceramics and pottery, tiles, copper items, woodcarvings, decorative glass, and embroidery are a major component of Turkish culture. They are a stunning reflection of Turkey’s diverse cultural heritage and thousands of years of history. For more information on Turkish handicrafts visit www.kultur.gov.tr/ (click on Culture, then Handicrafts). www.lesartsturcs.org

The Turkish Ministry of Culture’s Revolving Capital Administration (DOSIM) promotes production of Anatolian handcrafts. DOSIM markets those products through its 13 Cultural Products Sales Centers located throughout the country. Please visit www.kultur.gov.tr/ and click on “DOSIM Shopping” to find out more about DOSIM and the locations of their Sales Centers.

Türk ve İslam Eserleri Müzesi Handcraft & Book Store
Türk İslam Eserleri Müzesi No:46 – SULTANAHMET
Tel : 0212 517 74 10

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The Turkish Ministry of Culture’s Revolving Capital Administration (DOSIM) Stores

www.gelenekselelsanatlari.gov.tr/index.php?language=eng

issuu.com/turgan/docs/dosim

works created in different periods as well as new works by new masters are for on Dosim stores in connection with Ministry of Tourism Culture.

Traditional Turkish Handicrafts, replicated soil products, stone products, mineral products, glass products, animal products, vegetable products, textiles and jewelry are sold in these stores. The Ministry of Culture and Tourism publications are also sold through these DÖSİM stores.

is one of the great pleasures of a trip to Turkey and the rich variety of Turkish crafts makes it impossible to resist buying something. Fine apparel of silk, cotton, leather and wool; artful jewelry; leather accessories; brilliant faience (colored tiles); vessels of copper, brass, , meerschaum and alabaster worked by master artisans; and of course heirloom-quality Turkish and kilims, are among the most popular purchases. Great value and an enjoyable shopping experience can be found everywhere, from small towns to big cities. Visit the “What to buy” section at www.turizm.gov.tr/ to discover shopping opportunities in each province…

Unique regional handicrafts make shopping that much more enjoyable. Traditional Turkish handicrafts crafts including carpets, ceramics and pottery, tiles, copper items, woodcarvings, decorative glass, and embroidery are a major component of Turkish culture. They are a stunning reflection of Turkey’s diverse cultural heritage and thousands of years of history. For more information on Turkish handicrafts visit www.kultur.gov.tr/ (click on Culture, then Handicrafts). www.lesartsturcs.org

The Turkish Ministry of Culture’s Revolving Capital Administration (DOSIM) promotes production of Anatolian handcrafts. DOSIM markets those products through its 13 Cultural Products Sales Centers located throughout the country. Please visit www.kultur.gov.tr/ and click on “DOSIM Shopping” to find out more about DOSIM and the locations of their Sales Centers.

Cağaloğlu Book Store
Ankara Cad. No:46 – CAĞALOĞLU
Tel : 0212 512 64 51

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Handicrafts

The Touring and Automobile Club of Turkey has restored the old Cedid Mehmet Efendi Medresesi in Sultanahmet and now operates it as the Istanbul Handicrafts Center. The center’s aim is to revive dying crafts and show visitors how these arts and crafts were performed. Each of its rooms is devoted to a traditional Turkish craft, such as producing marbled paper, , painting , making lace, pinking and embroidering. There is also traditional bookbinding, and a glass and atelier.

www.istanbulhandicraftcenter.com/

Nuruosmaniye Cad. No:32  Cagaloglu  Istanbul  34440  Tel  90 (212) 520 91 92 PBX

Kabasakal Cad. (the side street next to the Dervis Tea Garden and across from the Blue ), Sultanahmet

The street-front to the workshops in this restored 17th-century medrese has a choice collection of precious ceramic and porcelain reproductions from Kütahya and Iznik

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Handicrafts

The Touring and Automobile Club of Turkey has restored the old Cedid Mehmet Efendi Medresesi in Sultanahmet and now operates it as the Istanbul Handicrafts Center. The center’s aim is to revive dying crafts and show visitors how these arts and crafts were performed. Each of its rooms is devoted to a traditional Turkish craft, such as producing marbled paper, , painting , making lace, pinking and embroidering. There is also traditional bookbinding, and a glass and atelier.

www.istanbulhandicraftcenter.com/

Nuruosmaniye Cad. No:32  Cagaloglu 

Istanbul  34440

Tel  90 (212) 520 91 92 PBX

Kabasakal Cad. (the side street next to the Dervis Tea Garden and across from the Blue ), Sultanahmet

The street-front to the workshops in this restored 17th-century medrese has a choice collection of precious ceramic and porcelain reproductions from Kütahya and Iznik

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

FavoriteLoadingSave to Favorites!  |  CATEGORIES: Shopping, Whereist Authentic Shopping, Whereist Sultanahmet

The Turkish Ministry of Culture’s Revolving Capital Administration (DOSIM) Stores

www.gelenekselelsanatlari.gov.tr/index.php?language=eng

issuu.com/turgan/docs/dosim

works created in different periods as well as new works by new masters are for on Dosim stores in connection with Ministry of Tourism Culture.

Traditional Turkish Handicrafts, replicated soil products, stone products, mineral products, glass products, animal products, vegetable products, textiles and jewelry are sold in these stores. The Ministry of Culture and Tourism publications are also sold through these DÖSİM stores.

is one of the great pleasures of a trip to Turkey and the rich variety of Turkish crafts makes it impossible to resist buying something. Fine apparel of silk, cotton, leather and wool; artful jewelry; leather accessories; brilliant faience (colored tiles); vessels of copper, brass, , meerschaum and alabaster worked by master artisans; and of course heirloom-quality Turkish and kilims, are among the most popular purchases. Great value and an enjoyable shopping experience can be found everywhere, from small towns to big cities. Visit the “What to buy” section at www.turizm.gov.tr/ to discover shopping opportunities in each province…

Unique regional handicrafts make shopping that much more enjoyable. Traditional Turkish handicrafts crafts including carpets, ceramics and pottery, tiles, copper items, woodcarvings, decorative glass, and embroidery are a major component of Turkish culture. They are a stunning reflection of Turkey’s diverse cultural heritage and thousands of years of history. For more information on Turkish handicrafts visit www.kultur.gov.tr/ (click on Culture, then Handicrafts). www.lesartsturcs.org

The Turkish Ministry of Culture’s Revolving Capital Administration (DOSIM) promotes production of Anatolian handcrafts. DOSIM markets those products through its 13 Cultural Products Sales Centers located throughout the country. Please visit www.kultur.gov.tr/ and click on “DOSIM Shopping” to find out more about DOSIM and the locations of their Sales Centers.


İstanbul Prestij Handcraft Store
Girişi
34400-İSTANBUL
0212 514 56 49


Prestij Halı- Store
Bab-ı Humayun Cad. No . 2/4 Ayasofya girişi –SULTANAHMET
0212 514 56 49


Türk ve İslam Eserleri Müzesi Handcraft & Book Store
Türk İslam Eserleri Müzesi No:46 – SULTANAHMET
Tel : 0212 517 74 10

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The Turkish Ministry of Culture’s Revolving Capital Administration (DOSIM) Stores

www.ges.gov.tr/en/urunler/

www.gelenekselelsanatlari.gov.tr/index.php?language=eng

issuu.com/turgan/docs/dosim

works created in different periods as well as new works by new masters are for on Dosim stores in connection with Ministry of Tourism Culture.

Traditional Turkish Handicrafts, replicated soil products, stone products, mineral products, glass products, animal products, vegetable products, textiles and jewelry are sold in these stores. The Ministry of Culture and Tourism publications are also sold through these DÖSİM stores.

is one of the great pleasures of a trip to Turkey and the rich variety of Turkish crafts makes it hard to resist purchases. Fine apparel of silk, cotton, leather and wool; artful jewelry; leather accessories; brilliant faience (colored tiles); vessels of copper, brass, , meerschaum and alabaster worked by master artisans; and of course heirloom-quality Turkish and kilims, are among the most popular purchases. Great value and an enjoyable shopping experience can be found everywhere, from small towns to big cities. Visit the “What to buy” section at www.turizm.gov.tr/ to discover shopping opportunities in each province…

Unique regional handicrafts make shopping that much more enjoyable. Traditional Turkish handicrafts crafts including carpets, ceramics and pottery, tiles, copper items, woodcarvings, decorative glass, and embroidery are a major component of Turkish culture. They are a stunning reflection of Turkey’s diverse cultural heritage and thousands of years of history. For more information on Turkish handicrafts visit www.kultur.gov.tr/ (click on Culture, then Handicrafts). www.lesartsturcs.org

The Turkish Ministry of Culture’s Revolving Capital Administration (DOSIM) promotes production of Anatolian handcrafts. DOSIM markets those products through its 13 Cultural Products Sales Centers located throughout the country. Please visit www.kultur.gov.tr/ and click on “DOSIM Shopping” to find out more about DOSIM and the locations of their Sales Centers.

Bahçekapı Handcraft & Book Store
Hobyar Mah. Şeyhülislam Hayri Efendi
Cad. No. 2/1 EMİNÖNÜ
0212 526 68 13

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FavoriteLoadingSave to Favorites!  |  CATEGORIES: Shopping, Whereist Authentic Shopping, Whereist Sultanahmet

The Turkish Ministry of Culture’s Revolving Capital Administration (DOSIM) Stores

www.gelenekselelsanatlari.gov.tr/index.php?language=eng

issuu.com/turgan/docs/dosim

works created in different periods as well as new works by new masters are for on Dosim stores in connection with Ministry of Tourism Culture.

Traditional Turkish Handicrafts, replicated soil products, stone products, mineral products, glass products, animal products, vegetable products, textiles and jewelry are sold in these stores. The Ministry of Culture and Tourism publications are also sold through these DÖSİM stores.

is one of the great pleasures of a trip to Turkey and the rich variety of Turkish crafts makes it impossible to resist buying something. Fine apparel of silk, cotton, leather and wool; artful jewelry; leather accessories; brilliant faience (colored tiles); vessels of copper, brass, , meerschaum and alabaster worked by master artisans; and of course heirloom-quality Turkish and kilims, are among the most popular purchases. Great value and an enjoyable shopping experience can be found everywhere, from small towns to big cities. Visit the “What to buy” section at www.turizm.gov.tr/ to discover shopping opportunities in each province…

Unique regional handicrafts make shopping that much more enjoyable. Traditional Turkish handicrafts crafts including carpets, ceramics and pottery, tiles, copper items, woodcarvings, decorative glass, and embroidery are a major component of Turkish culture. They are a stunning reflection of Turkey’s diverse cultural heritage and thousands of years of history. For more information on Turkish handicrafts visit www.kultur.gov.tr/ (click on Culture, then Handicrafts). www.lesartsturcs.org

The Turkish Ministry of Culture’s Revolving Capital Administration (DOSIM) promotes production of Anatolian handcrafts. DOSIM markets those products through its 13 Cultural Products Sales Centers located throughout the country. Please visit www.kultur.gov.tr/ and click on “DOSIM Shopping” to find out more about DOSIM and the locations of their Sales Centers.

İstanbul Prestij Handcraft Store
Entrance
34400-İSTANBUL
0212 514 56 49

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