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AYNALIKAVAK PAVILION

At Kasimpasa on the north shore of the Golden Horn stands Aynalikavak Kasir, the only surviving building of a palace that was once one of the largest in Istanbul. Known as Tersane or Naval Arsenal Palace, its construction commenced in 1613 during the reign of Sultan Ahmed I, and additions continued to be made until the reign of Sultan Selim III (1789-1807). In the 15th and early 16th centuries this area was a forest which was one of Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror’s favourite excursion places. He would have his royal tent erected here and practise archery on the great archery field on the hilltop known as Okmeydani. When the Ottoman naval arsenal was established on the shore of the Golden Horn by Sultan Selim I (1512-1520) the forest became known as Tersane Park. The palace built here in the early 17th century was surrounded by a beautiful flower garden, to which eminent courtiers of the time made gifts of bulbs and plants.

Aynalıkavak Pavilion is the sole remaining building from a large Ottoman palace known as Aynalıkavak Palace or Tersane palace, dating back to the 17th century. This pretty building on the shore or the Golden Horn is a reminder that this now built-up area was for centuries a place parks, meadows and streams where the Ottoman sultans and before them the Byzantines came for country excursions.

After the Turkish conquest of İstanbul this attractive stretch of countryside stretching inland from the Golden Horn became an imperial park known as the Tersane Hasbahçe after the naval arsenal at neabry Kasımpaşa.

The earliest known building here dates from the reign of Sultan Ahmed I (1603-1617), and his successors added new country lodges over the centuries, until the entire complex became so large that is was referred to as Tersane or Aynalıkavak Palace.

Aynalıkavak Pavilion is one of these buildings, thought to date originally from the reign of Sultan Ahmed III (1703-1730), although extensive alterations under Selim III (1789-1807) transformed its appearance radically.The principal rooms are a reception room known as the Divanhane and the smaller Music Room. Bands of exquisite calligraphic decoration around the windows of these two rooms consist of verses by two famous poets, Şeyh Galib and Enderûni Fâzıl, in praise of the pavilion and Selim III. These talik inscriptions were designed by the calligrapher Yesari.

In terms of its architecture and decoration Aynalıkavak Pavilion is a rare and outstanding example of classical Ottoman architecture. This small building is only one storey, with a basement under the section facing the sea. The pavilion is of additional interest because of its strong associations with Sultan Selim III, a respected composer. The traditional fitted seats or sedir along the walls and settees resembling sedir, braziers, lamps and other contemporary furnishings reflect a way of life which has disappeared entirely today.

Today as an appropriate tribute to Sultan Selim III, who is a major figure of Turkish classical music, the basement of Aynalıkavak Pavilion houses an exhibition of Turkish musical instruments donated by various individuals and institutions, together with photographs of antique instruments at Topkapı Palace Museum. In summer the pretty gardens and cafeteria attract many visitors, as do the Aynalıkavak Concerts of classical Turkish art music. Private receptions are held in the gardens here.

Aynalıkavak Palace is a former Ottoman palace located in the Hasköy neighborhood in Istanbul, Turkey. It was constructed during the reign of Sultan Ahmed I (1603-1617), with various additions and changes over time. It is under the administration of the Turkish Department of National Palaces.

The importance of the shipyards on the Golden Horn meant that there was a need for somewhere close at hand where the sultans could stay while visiting them. The answer lay in the early 17th century Tersane Sarayı (Shipyard Palace), originally built for Sultan Ahmed I, who liked to practice his archery in the Okmeydanı on nearby Hasköy Hill. Today all that survives of the waterside palace is the Aynalıkavak Kasrı (Pavilion of the Mirrored Poplars), a pavilion added to the site by Sultan Ahmed III, who wanted a pied à terre within easy reach of the Kağıthane and Alibey streams (then the pleasure grounds known as the Sweet Waters of Europe), where he could throw his famous tulip-peeping parties.

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In 1730 the palace lost its raison d’être with the overthrow of the sultan and his powerful grand vizier, although it received a new lease of life in the late 18th century when the music-loving Sultan Selim III had it restored as a venue for private concerts.

It was restored again during the reign of Sultan Mahmud II (r. 1808-39). In theory, it’s once again under restoration, although the signs stating that fact have now been in place for so long that they’re growing rusty with age.  For the time being, you’ll have to content yourself with inspecting the tiles at the base of the Eyüp funicular, which depict the pavilion in its heyday, with the sultan watching acrobatics taking place on the Golden Horn right in front of it.

Aynalikavak Pavilion

The Aynalıkavak Pavilion is located in the Hasköy neighborhood in Kasımpaşa, Istanbul. It is not exactly known as to when it was built, but Evliya Çelebi, the famous 17th century Ottoman traveler and writer, states that it was built during the period of Sultan Mehmed II. Another source says that the pavilion was been built by Admiral Halil Paşa in 1613.

The name, Aynalıkavak Pavilion, comes from the mirrors which were a gift to Sultan Ahmed III after the Treaty of Passarowitz was signed and during which the Republic of Venice was left the Mora Peninsula to the Turks. The pavillion was built on a slope and its garden was decorated with different kinds of trees. One enters the pavillon through the porch and then passes into a wide hall. There are couches covered with silk located at the three corners of the wide hall, and a poem written by Sultan Selim III in gold print is located on the blue painted wall. The land façade sits on two floors and the sea-side façade on three. The pavilion has a divan room and an audience hall (Arz Odası) decorated with several works of calligraphy, nice windows, and mirrors. Its ceiling is covered by a dome.

In the beginning of the 19th century, the Aynalıkavak Pavilion was called the Has Bahçe. During the rule of Sultan Mahmut II it was restored by the architect Kirkor Balyan. It took its present shape during the Reign of  Sultan Selim III.

During the Tulip Era, (or Lâle Devri in Turkish), the pavilion hosted many entertainment venues. In addition, it hosted the Aynalıkavak Agreement signed by Sultan Abdülhamid I on January 9, 1784 between the Ottoman Empire and Russia.

The Aynalıkavak Pavilion is presently a palace-museum and houses the Turkish Music Research Center and the Museum of Instruments in its basement.

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 |  CATEGORIES: Historical Landmark, Whereist Eyup and Fatih, Whereist Fall of Constantinople

Church of the Virgin of Blachernae (Istanbul)

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The Church of Panagia Blachernae (full name in Greek: Θεοτòκος τών Βλαχερνών (pr. Theotókos tón Blachernón); Turkish name: Meryem Ana Kilisesi) is located in Istanbul, in the district of Fatih, in the neighbourhood of Ayvansaray, along Mustafa Paşa Bostanı Sokak. It lies a few hundred meters inside the walled city, at a short distance from the shore of the Golden Horn. The building is protected by a high wall, and preceded by a garden.

History

The church is near the northern tip of the walls of Theodosius built by the Empress Pulcheria (ca. 450-453), and her husband, Emperor Marcian (450-457). They had the church built on the site of a sacred spring, which was a place of pilgrimage near the shore of the Golden Horn (known as Ayvansaray today). Inside is now the best known and most celebrated sanctuary to the Virgin Mary in Constantinople. Emperor Leo I (457-474) completed the church by adding the “Hagiasma” [1]. [2]He also built the “Hagion Lousma” [3].

Emperor Leo I also built the circular pareklision Hagia Soros (chapel), next to the church to contain the holy robe and girdle of the Virgin Mary, brought from Palestine in 458 (or 473). The chapel of the Virgin’s robe was covered in silver and considered a “reliquary of architectural dimensions.” Lay people were not allowed inside but could pray in the main church.[4] This very shrine housed the miracle-working icon of the Blachernitissa.

In 625-626, Constantinople was attacked by the Avards. Emperor Heraclius (575-641) campaigned against the Persians, however, the icon was carried in a procession along the city walls and so the saving of the city was attributed to the intervention of the Theotokos. In order to protect the sanctuary, and the city from such a siege, Leo I added the famous quarter of Blachernae in 627, with its venerated church, whose image was now considered the palladium of Constantinople. The circumference of the walls were then, and still are, eleven to twelve miles. By this stage, the church of Blachernae had around 75 endowed clerics.

During the iconoclastic period, and according to tradition, the icon disappeared and was then found hidden behind a wall during renovation works in 1030.

The church was burnt down in 1070 and rebuilt by the year 1077 either by Romanos IV Diogenes (1067-78) or Michael VII (1071-87) and then destroyed again by fire in 1434. The church, at this stage, was connected to the Palace of Blachernae by a stairway. After the fire, nothing remained of the fire apart from the Sacred Spring.

In 1867, the modern church was built and further additions have since been made to the structure. It is said, that the Akathistos was first chanted at this location and a special marble plaque, inscribed with the Akathistos verse, a celebrated Byzantine hymn, to the Theotokos, has now been placed above the Hagiasma. In addition, there are four wall paintings by the famous painter Eirenarchos Covas (1964)

To this very day, the spring is reputed to have therapeutic powers. Also associated with the history of this shrine is:

  • the history of the Palace of Blachernae;
  • the history of the Monastery of the Hodegetria
  • the icon, the Panagia Hagiosoritissa.[5];
  • a procession, originating from the time of the Patriarch Timotheos [511-18]—the “panhgur j”—which would take place every Friday from Blachernai to the Church of the Chalkoprateia, near Hagia Sophia, at the other end of the city.[6];
  • the Eastern Council of Blachernae (Constantinople) in 1285. At this council, a significant statement was produced addressing the theological issue of the ‘Filioque’. Despite the concern of Byzantine theologians to oppose the idea of the Filioque and its addition to the creed, there is no reference to it in the Synodikon of Orthodoxy [7];
  • the original icon of Tikhvin (Hodegetria), painted by the Holy Apostle Luke and kept in the Church of Blachernae for about five hundred years. It was sent to Russia in 1383, before the fall of Constantinople. It is said that fishermen saw it surrounded in lights over the Lake of Ladoga in Russia. The icon was later found on the bank of the Tikhvin River and was placed in the local church. Recently, the icon was kept in Chicago and returned to Russia.
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Thronged by thousands daily, Istiklal Caddesi is chock full of buildings that reflect the cultural changes of the recent period and the dynamism of the times. With their cinemas, theaters, restaurants, cafes and art galleries, the famous arcades of Beyoğlu preserve their original vitality even as their owners and regulars come and go.

Passage Oriental’ – Passage Markiz

Finally, after the Suriye Pasaj and almost at the Tünel appears the ‘Passage Oriental’, which stood vacant for years until it reopened recently as the Passage Markiz. Known as the Lebon Patisserie until 1940 when it became Markiz Patisserie, this café and pastry shop is located right at the entrance to the arcade. An important center of cultural and social activity in its day, it was also a meeting place of artists, writers and intellectuals for years.

With its ever changing face, Beyoğlu has undergone many transformations in the last two hundred years but has always preserved a special place in the memory. The sole unchanged witness of that change and dynamism are the buildings that line the avenue from end to end.

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 |  CATEGORIES: Shopping, Tours, Whereist Beyoglu

Thronged by thousands daily, Istiklal Caddesi is chock full of buildings that reflect the cultural changes of the recent period and the dynamism of the times. With their cinemas, theaters, restaurants, cafes and art galleries, the famous arcades of Beyoğlu preserve their original vitality even as their owners and regulars come and go.


Suriye (Syria) PasajISTANBUL’S MOST RESPLENDENT ARCADE

At the lower end of İstiklal Caddesi another arcade rises before us which distinguishes itself from all the others. Built by Suriye Paşa in the 1880’s, the Suriye (Syria) Pasaj is the most resplendent of them all on the interior. The original building was designed with a shopping area on the lower level and dwellings on the upper levels and is said to be the first building after the imperial palace to be supplied with electricity and city gas. Turkey’s first movie theater was also opened in this arcade which boasts two elevators. Silent films began to be shown here in 1910 in a cinema called the Ciné Central, which later took the names Şafak and then Cumhuriyet before unfortunately closing after it was renamed the Zafer Cinema. The French-language Istanbul daily Stamboul was printed here from 1875 to 1964, as is today the Greek-language Apoyevmatini, which has been published since 1925 in the old-fashioned way in black and white and without photographs.

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 |  CATEGORIES: Shopping, Tours, Whereist Beyoglu

Thronged by thousands daily, Istiklal Caddesi is chock full of buildings that reflect the cultural changes of the recent period and the dynamism of the times. With their cinemas, theaters, restaurants, cafes and art galleries, the famous arcades of Beyoğlu preserve their original vitality even as their owners and regulars come and go.


El-Hamra Pasaj

Directly opposite the Church of St. Antoine, conspicuous for its magnificent architecture, the El-Hamra Pasaj, built in the first half of the 19th century, is quieter than the others.

At first an entertainment center with a French Theater and Billur Saray (Crystal Palace), this arcade was subsequently razed and rebuilt to accommodate the most opulent theater of its time, built by the famous architects Ekrem Hakkı Ayverdi and Kiryadis. Interest in the El-Hamra waned as new movie theaters went up around the city, and a new one has now been erected in its place after a recent fire.



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 |  CATEGORIES: Shopping, Tours, Whereist Beyoglu

Thronged by thousands daily, Istiklal Caddesi is chock full of buildings that reflect the cultural changes of the recent period and the dynamism of the times. With their cinemas, theaters, restaurants, cafes and art galleries, the famous arcades of Beyoğlu preserve their original vitality even as their owners and regulars come and go.


Hacopulo (Hazzopulo) Pasaj

Built by the Istanbul Greek Hacopulo Family but better known today as the ‘Danışman Geçidi’, the Hacopulo Pasaj housed some of the most fashionable shops of its day. Home to vendors of thread, buttons and headgear, this arcade at the same time had a political mission. The Young Turks met here and their newspaper, ‘İbret’, published by Ahmet Mithat Efendi and Namık Kemal, was also printed on the premises. A venue mainly of small cafeteria-type restaurants today, the arcade also has a few book dealers and old-fashioned artisans’ establishments.


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 |  CATEGORIES: Shopping, Tours, Whereist Beyoglu

Thronged by thousands daily, Istiklal Caddesi is chock full of buildings that reflect the cultural changes of the recent period and the dynamism of the times. With their cinemas, theaters, restaurants, cafes and art galleries, the famous arcades of Beyoğlu preserve their original vitality even as their owners and regulars come and go.


Aznavur Pasaj
Built in 1883, the Aznavur Pasaj subsequently underwent several renovations. Its shops sell a host of gift items ranging from miniatures, mother-of-pearl inlaid boxes and water pipes to clothing that appeals to the young people.


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 |  CATEGORIES: Shopping, Tours, Whereist Beyoglu

Thronged by thousands daily, Istiklal Caddesi is chock full of buildings that reflect the cultural changes of the recent period and the dynamism of the times. With their cinemas, theaters, restaurants, cafes and art galleries, the famous arcades of Beyoğlu preserve their original vitality even as their owners and regulars come and go.


THE HISTORIC FLOWER PASSAGE
When you reach the square in front of Galatasaray Lycée at the heart of Beyoğlu, if it’s evening the melodies beginning to rise in the distance and the voices of the people singing along will lure you into the famous Çiçek Pasaj or ‘Flower Passage’. Aka ‘Cité de Pera’, Çiçek Pasaj boasts a plethora of traditional restaurants where you can quench your thirst and sample the tasty Turkish appetizers known as ‘meze’. Çiçek Pasaj, which opens at one end onto the avenue and at the other onto the old Istanbul Balık Pazarı or Fish Market, plays host to some very old denizens indeed. Maruni Naum Efendi’s wooden theater and a hotel called ‘Palais des Fleurs’ once stood in the area where the Çiçek Pasaj and Avrupa Pasaj, both built following the Pera fire of 1870, stand today. The Avrupa Pasaj in particular presents a sharp contrast to the other arcades with its unique architecture and ornamentation. The statues in the arches of the upper level of this long, corridor-like arcade and the unusual items sold in the shops give this pasaj a different air. Colorful ceramic tiles, embroidered silk covers and Turkish fabrics and kilims dazzle the eye in this pasaj which is known as the mirrored arcade for the mirror-encased columns separating the shops. Continuing along the avenue we come to the Aznavur and Hacopulo (Hazzopulo) arcades, where Italian architecture reigns supreme.


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 |  CATEGORIES: Shopping, Tours, Whereist Beyoglu

Thronged by thousands daily, Istiklal Caddesi is chock full of buildings that reflect the cultural changes of the recent period and the dynamism of the times. With their cinemas, theaters, restaurants, cafes and art galleries, the famous arcades of Beyoğlu preserve their original vitality even as their owners and regulars come and go.


Atlas Pasaj

Directly opposite the Halep Pasaj is the Atlas Pasaj, at whose entrance are the Atlas Cinema and the Sadri Alışık Theater. The two buildings at the back of this arcade, which consists of three large structures, has the appearance of a mall with numerous shops.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

 |  CATEGORIES: Shopping, Tours, Whereist Beyoglu

Thronged by thousands daily, Istiklal Caddesi is chock full of buildings that reflect the cultural changes of the recent period and the dynamism of the times. With their cinemas, theaters, restaurants, cafes and art galleries, the famous arcades of Beyoğlu preserve their original vitality even as their owners and regulars come and go.


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Rumeli Pasaj

When you stroll from Taksim Square down to Tünel, the Rumeli Pasaj (arcade) appears on your right just after the French Consulate. Built

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