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(Beyazit, Kapalıçarşı Örüculer Kapısı Sok. 32)

It is located in Beyazit, near the roofed bazaar. Small and clean, it is known as "the back hamam" since it was the place most visited by the workers, who carried the products to the bazaar on their back. It has five "water tanks" and two heated marble surfaces on which you lie down for a massage. Opens at 6a.m. in the morning for 17 hours. For men only.
Kapalicarci Oruculer Kapisi Sokak No 32, Beyazit, Eminonu
+ 90 212 527 9263

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 |  CATEGORIES: Historical Landmark, Whereist Sultanahmet

The German Fountain (Turkish: Alman Çeşmesi) is a gazebo styled fountain in the northern end of old hippodrome (Sultanahmet Square), Istanbul, Turkey and across from the Mausoleum of Sultan Ahmed I. It was constructed to commemorate the second anniversary of German Emperor Wilhelm II‘s visit to Istanbul in 1898. It was built in Germany, then transported piece by piece and assembled in its current site in 1900. The neo-Byzantine style fountain’s octagonal dome has eight marble columns, and dome’s interior is covered with golden mosaics.

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History

Historic painting

The idea of Great Palace of Constantinople‘s Empire Lodge (Kathisma) being on the site of the German Fountain’s, conflicts with the view that Carceres Gates of Hippodrome was found on the site of the fountain however, the hypothesis of Carceres Gates being on the site enforces the view that Quadriga of Lysippos was used to stand on the site of the German Fountain.[1]

During his reign, German Emperor and King of Prussia, Wilhelm II visited several European and Eastern countries. His trip started in Istanbul, Ottoman Empire on October 18, 1898 during the reign of Abdülhamid II.[2] According to Peter Hopkirk, the visit to Ottoman Empire was an ego trip and also had long-term motivations:[2] The Emperor’s primary motivation for visiting was to construct the Baghdad Railway, which would run from Berlin to the Persian Gulf, and would further connect to British India through Persia.[2] This railway could provide a short and quick route from Europe to Asia, and could carry German exports, troops and artillery.[3] At the time, the Ottoman Empire could not afford such a railway, and Abdülhamid II was grateful to Wilhelm’s offer, but was suspicious over the German motives.[4] Abdülhamid II’s secret service believed that German archeologists in the Emperor’s retinue were in fac geologists with designs on the oil wealth of the Ottoman empire. Later, the secret service uncovered a German report, which noted that the oilfields in Mosul, northern Mesopotamia were richer than that in the Caucuses.[4] In his first visit, Wilhelm secured the sale of German-made rifles to Ottoman Army, and in his second visit he secured a promise for German companies to construct the Istanbul-Baghdad railway.[5] The German Government constructed the German Fountain for Wilhelm II and Empress Augusta‘s 1898 Istanbul visit.[1] According to Afife Batur, the fountain’s plans were drawn by architect Spitta and constructed by architect Schoele, also German architect Carlitzik and Italian architect Joseph Anthony worked on this project.[6]

According to the Ottoman inscription, the fountain’s construction started in the Hejira 1319 (18981899),[7] although inauguration of fountain was planned to take place on September 1, 1900 – the 25th anniversary of Abdülhamid II’s ascension to the throne. Construction, however, could not finish at the planned time and it was instead inaugurated on January 27, 1901 which was Wilhelm II’s birthdate.[6] Marble, stone and gem parts of the fountain were constructed in Germany and transported piece by piece to Istanbul by ships.[6]

Architecture

Dome’s interior part

Wilhelm II’s inscription

German Fountain constructed on the site where there was a tree which is known as Vakvak Tree (Turkish: Vakvak Ağacı) or The Bloody Plane (Turkish: Kanlı Çınar).[8] In 1656 janissary rebellion, Mehmed IV gave demanded persons to the rebellious and the killed ones were hanged on the Plane in Hippodrome.[8] Boynuyaralı Mehmed Pasha overcame this rebellion, which took two months and named Vak’a-i Vakvakiye, after becoming Grand Vizier.[8] The plane named after Seçere-i Vakvak (Vakvak Tree) which believed to be in Jahannam and its fruits are human heads.[8]

The neo-Byzantine style octagonal fountain stood on a high floor, eight stairs, seven brass tap and over its reservoir there is a dome which has eight porphyry columns.[6][9] Reservoir is standing on mosaic tiled platform and it is surrounded with bronze dome and carved marble.[6] There are eight monograms in the stonework and they represent political union of Abdülhamid II and Wilhelm.[7] There are eight medallion situated on archs that are between columns. In four of these medallions, Abdülhamid II’s tughra is written on green background, and in other four Wilhelm’s symbol “W” is written on Prussia blue background. Also, over “W” there is a crown and below it a “II” is written. Dome was surrounded with bronze circle, but unfortunately this circle was stolen. Exterior bronze green dome is standing over eight porphyry columns, and dome’s interior is surface decorated with golden mosaics and again with Abdülhamid II’s tughra and Wilhelm II’s symbol.[6]

The bronze inscription on reservoir, which was written in German, reads “Wilhelm II Deutscher Kaiser Stiftete Diesen Brunnen In Dankbarer Erinnerung An Seinen Besuch Bei Seiner Majiestaet [sic] Dem Kaiser Der Osmanen Abdul Hamid II Im Herbst Des Jahres 1898” meaning “German Kaiser Wilhelm II, who constructed this fountain in 1898 autumn, as a gratitude remembrance for his visit to Ottoman Sultan Abdülhamid II”. There is also an Ottoman inscription in the arch of fountain, Undersecretary of Seraskery Ahmet Muhtar Bey’s eight couplet history verse is written by Hattat İzzet Efendi.[6] In lines, fountain’s construction for commemorating Wilhelm II’s Istanbul visit is told

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History

The extraordinary building with the high domes supported on six stone piers situated at the top of the hill at the end of the row of small hotels in the narrow street immediately behind St. Sophia was orginally built, more than a thousand years ago, as a cistern. Until recently it was used as an automobile repair shop.

But, it is no longer so.

The Turkish Touring and Automobile Association, which converted the old houses in the same street into a row of small hotels, has also repaired and restored the cistern, converting it into a “Roma Tavern”.

The Cistern Tavern is a great and dramatic synthesis a witness, a document of the three thousand years old history of Istanbul; the capital of three Empires.
A restaurant of the Republican period in a Roman cistern at the end of an old Ottoman Street:

Just beside Ayasofya, in Istanbul, you will find a Roman cistern as old as Ayasofya itself.
This extraordinary building, with its massive stone columns and its lofty brick domes, stands at the head of a row of guesthouse forming the narrow “Soğukçeşme” Street between Topkapı Palace walls and St. Sophia.

The Turkish Touring and Automobile Association converted the old houses of “Soğukçeşme” Street into a row of guesthouse, cleaned out the 1600 years old Roman Cistern, which was unfortunately used as a car repair workshop untill recently.

The present floor level reaches to a debt of seven meters but investigations had shown that the six large, massive, single-piece columns descend three meters below this grounded level. The original room has been preserved exactly as it was. The only addition to this cistern is a fire-place in the ancient style. Tis fine Roman Cistern Restaurant simply named “Sarnıç Restaurant” in turkish, which gives the literal description of the building.

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www.sarnicrestaurant.com/en/index.jsp

Sarnic Restaurant
Sogukcesme Sokagi 34220 Sultanahmet / Istanbul
Phone: 0212 512 42 91 – 513 36 60 – Fax: 0212 514 52 30

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 |  CATEGORIES: Cultural & Museums, Whereist Beyazit

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The Press Museum features information and materials on Turkish press from İbrahim Müteferrika, the founder of Turkish publication history, to date.

The museum is also known as the original building of Darülfünun (University) which was opened in 1871. The restored building was turned into Press Museum in 1988. The museum features information and materials on Turkish press from İbrahim Müteferrika, founder of Turkish publication history, to date.

Address: Divanyolu Road, No:84, Çemberlitaş
Ph: +90 212 513 84 77

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 |  CATEGORIES: Bars & Drinks, Food, Tours, Whereist Beyoglu

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Coffee break!: Another place that offers fantastic Turkish coffee is a shop called Gezi located right beside the Atatürk Cultural Center in Taksim. It is possible to see famous people there almost all the time. Attracting people with its handmade chocolates and desserts, the bakery offers dishes from both the Turkish and Ottoman kitchen. Gezi actually has four sections: a bakery, a cafe, a restaurant and a chocolaterie. One can find all kinds of desserts, meals, coffee, jams and organic goods at Gezi.

www.geziistanbul.com/

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There is an amazing venue located at Rumelihisarı, offering a wonderful view of the Bosporus. Turkish coffee is heated over the stove. Known for its traditional Turkish coffee, Sade Kahve offers breakfast early in the morning and continues to serve customers until sunset. The shop is located in the Oduncubaşı seaside home of Ayla and Recep Aral.

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In recent years, many restaurants, cafes and hotels have replaced Turkish coffee with coffee made by automatic machines. International coffee shop chains appeal to young people, making espressos more popular than Turkish coffee.

A group of people who love to drink coffee and are disturbed by the diminishing popularity of Turkish coffee set up the Turkish Coffee Culture and Research Foundation last year. The chairman of the foundation is Atom Damalı, its members include people who contribute a great deal to the sector such as Ahmet Örs, Mehmet Aksel, Merve Gürsel, Osman Serim, Semir Orcan and Ali Sözmen. The mission of the foundation is to set up a standard of how to make Turkish coffee and give it the global attention it deserves. The foundation is also planning to write a book and film a comprehensive documentary on Turkish coffee.

Where did Turkish coffee come from?

Coffee, which is a crop native to Ethiopia, spread to the Arabian Peninsula, especially Yemen, after the 11th century. In 1517, Yemen Governor Özdemir Pasha fell in love with the drink when he was introduced to it and brought it to İstanbul. But the Turks changed the method of preparing coffee by using copper vessels called güğüms and coffee pots called cezves. Coffee made through this method eventually became known as Turkish coffee. Coffeehouses, the first of which opened in Tahtakale and quickly spread across the city, introduced locals to Turkish coffee. Sipping coffee and listening to poetry, literature and recitations from books at coffeehouses became a popular social activity during that time. News of the delicious coffee spread to Europe — and from there, to the rest of the world — with Ottoman messengers and merchants and travelers passing through İstanbul. Initially, Turkish coffee was made without sugar. Instead, it was customary to eat or drink something sweet before or after drinking coffee. But today, Turkish coffee is made either plain or with different amounts of sugar depending on taste.

Where to drink Turkish coffee

Coffee pleasure by the poolside:

Çorlulu Ali Paşa Medresesi is a historic location. Located on the tramway road in Beyazıt, the medrese is a popular venue for coffee and nargile addicts. It is a gathering place for college students and a frequent stop for retired people, local merchants and tourists. The medrese, which offers guests the opportunity to drink coffee under sycamore trees by a poolside, is open until 2:00 a.m. Guests can also visit the rug repair shop in the medrese.

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Taste Turkish coffee heated on coals:

Nevi Cafe is located in Ayakapı. It was used as a police station during the Ottoman Empire and was later restored to its authentic character. Attracting customers with its view of the Golden Horn and fascinating decor, the cafe is especially popular for its Turkish coffee, which is heated on coals. A visit to the past and an amazing cup of coffee await guests at the cafe.

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 |  CATEGORIES: Bars & Drinks, Bosphorus, Food, Tours

A beautiful coffee shop in Çengelköy:

Çınaraltı Kahvesi is a special place where one can enjoy either tea or coffee while enjoying a breathtaking view of the Bosporus. Located in Üsküdar’s Çengelköy neighborhood, the coffee shop gets it name from the historical sycamore tree (Çınar in Turkish) it was built under. It opens at 7:00 a.m. and continues to serve customers until midnight. Çınaraltı Kahvesi was used as a setting for Turkish television shows “Süper Babe” and “Çınaraltı.”

www.cengelkoycinaralti.com/

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In recent years, many restaurants, cafes and hotels have replaced Turkish coffee with coffee made by automatic machines. International coffee shop chains appeal to young people, making espressos more popular than Turkish coffee.

A group of people who love to drink coffee and are disturbed by the diminishing popularity of Turkish coffee set up the Turkish Coffee Culture and Research Foundation last year. The chairman of the foundation is Atom Damalı, its members include people who contribute a great deal to the sector such as Ahmet Örs, Mehmet Aksel, Merve Gürsel, Osman Serim, Semir Orcan and Ali Sözmen. The mission of the foundation is to set up a standard of how to make Turkish coffee and give it the global attention it deserves. The foundation is also planning to write a book and film a comprehensive documentary on Turkish coffee.

Where did Turkish coffee come from?

Coffee, which is a crop native to Ethiopia, spread to the Arabian Peninsula, especially Yemen, after the 11th century. In 1517, Yemen Governor Özdemir Pasha fell in love with the drink when he was introduced to it and brought it to İstanbul. But the Turks changed the method of preparing coffee by using copper vessels called güğüms and coffee pots called cezves. Coffee made through this method eventually became known as Turkish coffee. Coffeehouses, the first of which opened in Tahtakale and quickly spread across the city, introduced locals to Turkish coffee. Sipping coffee and listening to poetry, literature and recitations from books at coffeehouses became a popular social activity during that time. News of the delicious coffee spread to Europe — and from there, to the rest of the world — with Ottoman messengers and merchants and travelers passing through İstanbul. Initially, Turkish coffee was made without sugar. Instead, it was customary to eat or drink something sweet before or after drinking coffee. But today, Turkish coffee is made either plain or with different amounts of sugar depending on taste.

Where to drink Turkish coffee

Coffee shop famous for its celebrities:

One of the most popular places to drink coffee in İstanbul is a coffee shop right by the waterside next to the Bebek Mosque. It is frequented by figures from the media, art and cinema world. It is especially crowded during the summer. It is also a great venue for a weekend breakfast. Coffee addicts love the foamy coffee offered there. It is open every day between 7:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m.

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